Nqobizitha Kunene - A boy of thirteen

Nqobizitha Kunene - A boy of thirteen

As we approach the end of the year, the Hampton-Piggs Peak Partnership is looking ahead to 2010 – assessing our financial resources and where to allocate them. During the current year we provided school fees for 70 high school students in Piggs Peak and supported a number of other projects.

For instance, as part of our support for the development of vegetable gardens, we purchased a heavy-duty rototiller for use by the community. John Lovett recently told us “the rototiller is operating eight to ten hours a day as weather permits”. We also provide help to the needy people in Piggs Peak by providing clothing, shoes, and school bags. “Sometimes it’s the little things that are most appreciated”, John says. “With the rainy season under way, cheap plastic raincoats are another item which is always welcome for those students who must walk a long distance to school.”

 

With the funds provided by the people in Hampton, we also help care for children on impoverished homesteads by providing food.  At the moment there are five homesteads we help with a total of 27 orphaned children.  We also provide support for Tenele, the girl who lives in the Macambeni area and has been mentioned in previous articles. But, unfortunately, our help only goes so far and we are sometimes reminded we are fighting an uphill battle. In his latest email, John writes, “It has been some time since we have lost any of our closest children, so it comes as a shock when once again we lose one of our kids.  The student's name was Nqobizitha Kunene He was a boy of thirteen. … He was a good student who worked hard and attained a high position in his grade.  On Thursday afternoon he complained of not feeling well and we took him to the clinic.  On Friday morning he did not wake up.”

 

In the same correspondence, John states “I don't think many people in developed countries realize the impact that disease and poverty have on countries like Swaziland.  3,500 children die each year; that is ten a day. I try to place some of the statistics into a perspective which Canadians might understand.  According to my research, the population of New Brunswick is 750,000 (similar to Swaziland).  What would happen if 10 New Brunswick children died every day?  That is the harsh reality of the statistics in Swaziland.”

 

Your donation to the Hampton-Piggs Peak Partnership will allow us to increase the support we are providing in the upcoming year. Perhaps we can’t materially change the statistics but just maybe, with your help, we can prevent the death of another boy like Nqobizitha. If you would like to help by making a donation to the Hampton-Piggs Peak Partnership please call Mark Bettle at 832-0003 or visit our website at www.hamptonpiggspeak.ca.

Nqobizitha Kunene - A boy of thirteen